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Anti-Racism & Equity Resources: Educator Resources

An introduction to resources about anti-racism and racism.

Definitions

Diversity is the range of human differences, including but not limited to race, ethnicity, gender identity, sexual identity & orientation, age, socioeconomic class, physical ability or attributes, neurodivergence or neurological condition, religious or ethical values system, and national origin (adapted from Ferris State University).

Equity is defined as “the state, quality or ideal of being just, impartial, and fair.” The concept of equity is closely tied to fairness and justice, and all three are context-specific to the historical, systemic barriers, disadvantages, and power disparities present in any given situation. It is helpful to think of equity as not simply a desired state of affairs or a "finish line," but instead as a continuous structural concept—a lens and mindset (proactively reinforced by policies, practices, attitudes, and actions) through which power is redistributed and inequity is challenged and addressed (adapted from Race Equity and Inclusion Action Guide).

Inclusion is involvement and empowerment, where the inherent worth and dignity of all people are recognized. An inclusive community promotes and sustains a sense of belonging; it values, celebrates, and recognizes the enriching benefits of diversity and practices respect for the talents, beliefs, identities, and lived experiences of its members (adapted from Ferris State University).

Justice is the systematic fair treatment of all people along all axes of identity and of any social position. In practice, it is the proactive operationalization of policies, practices, attitudes, and actions resulting in equitable access, opportunities, treatment, empowerment, and outcomes for all (adapted from Center for the Study of Social Policy).

  1. Inequality means being born on the wrong side of the tree versus the better side.
  2. Equality means trying to reconcile equity by giving an equal solution to both.
  3. Equity means knowing that there’s a right-sized solution to each individual.
  4. Justice means working to correct the system itself — e.g. tackling systemic racism.

Readings

Books