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Rising Scholars Program: Merced College Library: Information Literacy Resources

Cross-disciplinary library guide that provides one stop for accessing resources for students and faculty. Forms, timelines and contact information are also provided.

Information Has Value

Where and how information is disseminated

"Information possesses several dimensions of value, including as a commodity, as a means of education, as a means to influence, and as a means of negotiating and understanding the world.

Legal and socioeconomic interests influence information production and dissemination"  (ACRL Framework Information has Value 2015)

  • recognize issues of access or lack of access to information sources;
  • decide where and how their information is published;
  • understand how the commodification of their personal information and online interactions affects the information they receive and the information they produce or disseminate online;
  • make informed choices regarding their online actions in full awareness of issues related to privacy and the commodification of personal information. (ACRL Framwork 2015).

Copyright and Citation

  • give credit to the original ideas of others through proper attribution and citation;
  • understand that intellectual property is a legal and social construct that varies by culture;
  • articulate the purpose and distinguishing characteristics of copyright, fair use, open access, and the public domain.

Authority is Constructed & Contextual

Various information types, credibility and expertise.

  • define different types of authority, such as subject expertise (e.g., scholarship), societal position (e.g., public office or title), or special experience (e.g., participating in a historic event);
  • use research tools and indicators of authority to determine the credibility of sources, understanding the elements that might temper this credibility;
  • understand that many disciplines have acknowledged authorities in the sense of well-known scholars and publications that are widely considered “standard,” and yet, even in those situations, some scholars would challenge the authority of those sources;